On top at the bottom: Exploring Cape Horn
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On top at the bottom: Exploring Cape Horn

Here in the Strait of Magellan, at the bottom of South America where the Atlantic and Pacific oceans meet, it’s all about the weather.

The captain and crew of the Ventus Australis have said repeatedly that if weather conditions aren’t right – and much of the time they aren’t – we won’t be boarding Zodiac rafts to get an up-close look at some of the 4,000 Magellanic penguins who call Tucker Islets home.

But good fortune is with us; winds and waves are conducive to landing at the penguins’ doorstep and the loveable birds don’t disappoint.

They waddle and toddle and do their penguin things despite the rafts loaded with bundled-up humans observing them. It’s mid-March and time for teen-aged birds to fly the coop – or more accurately, leave the colony. We can identify teen birds because their black-colored bands are not yet distinct. And as far as I can tell, much like their human counterparts, they aren’t going anywhere.

Today is the second day of our five-day cruise on the Ventus Australis, a 200-passenger expedition ship that makes repeated voyages around the end of the South American continent. The cruise is part of the Odysseys Unlimited 17-day Patagonian Frontiers Tour that starts in Santiago and ends in Buenos Aires. ...


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Attached Files

On-top-at-the-bottom-Exploring-Cape-Horn.rtf
On-top-at-the-bottom-Exploring-Cape-Horn.rtf
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