Going coastal – classic English seaside towns
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Going coastal - classic English seaside towns

With a combination of nostalgic elements and modern edge twists, the great English seaside town is still going strong.

Art by the sea

You only have to stroll along the rippled sands of St Ives' spectacular Porthmeor Beach on a sunny day, with the ever-changing light bouncing off the Atlantic surf, to realise why this once busy pilchard-fishing village has become the hub of Cornwall's art scene - in particular the Tate St Ives gallery and the Barbara Hepworth Museum and Sculpture Garden. In the heart of town, a network of cobbled lanes are crammed with art studios, surf shops, brasseries and several bakeries selling hearty Cornish pasties.

Seafood haven

Much of Whitby's wide-ranging appeal stems not only from its rich seafaring history and atmospheric setting, but from its twin personality of working fishing port and traditional seaside resort. The imposing ruins of the 13th-century abbey loom over the town's skyline where narrow cobbled lanes and red-bricked houses spill down the slopes of the headland to a natural harbour below. Brightly-painted fishing boats line the quayside where salty characters load off their catch of haddock, monkfish, skate and crab destined for the town's numerous fish-and-chip shops.

Brighton rock

This quintessential mid-18th century seaside town that evokes images of Mods and Rockers, a lively gay scene and Brighton Beach, has in recent years become a hipster destination of choice, with its cutting-edge bars, slick boutique hotels and cool, bohemian vibe. The Grade-II listed Brighton Pier is still the place to go for some old fashioned seaside fun on its vintage fairground rides. Set back from the famous pebbly beach, backed by amusement arcades and Regency-era buildings, are The Lanes, once a fishing village and now a labyrinth of classy bistros, designer boutiques and quirky independent shops.

Turner prize

The fortunes of this English seaside holiday town on England's southeast coast have ebbed and flowed since JMW Turner produced seascapes here in the 19th century - and the Turner Contemporary gallery highlights Margate's links with the famous artist. Some of the town's other drawcards include its clean sandy beaches, the 27-mile Viking Coastal Trail, Dreamland amusement park, Hornby Visitor Centre (featuring model railways and cars), the mysterious Shell Grotto (underground passages decorated with millions of seashells) and the Tom Thumb Theatre, thought to be the world's smallest working theatre.

3 SEASIDE TREATS ...

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Attached Files

MARGATE-HARBOUR.-PHOTO-CREDIT-THANET-DISTRICT-COUNCIL-.jpg
MARGATE-HARBOUR.-PHOTO-CREDIT-THANET-DISTRICT-COUNCIL-.jpg
Going-coastal-classic-English-seaside-towns.rtf
Going-coastal-classic-English-seaside-towns.rtf
Cockles and Mussels for sale at a typical  seaside  shellfish stall. PHOTO CREDIT: Paul Cowan 123RF Stock Photos 
Cockles and Mussels for sale at a typical  seaside  shellfish stall. PHOTO CREDIT: Paul Cowan 123RF Stock Photos 
Fish and Chips, Magpie Café, Whitby. IMAGE CREDIT: Andrew Marshall
 Fish and Chips, Magpie Café, Whitby. IMAGE CREDIT: Andrew Marshall
The imposing ruins of the 13th century abbey loom over the old whaling port of Whitby, where narrow cobbled streets and red-bricked houses spill down the slopes of the headland to the natural harbour. IMAGE CREDIT: Paul Marshall
The imposing ruins of the 13th century abbey loom over the old whaling port of Whitby, where narrow cobbled streets and red-bricked houses spill down the slopes of the headland to the natural harbour. IMAGE CREDIT: Paul Marshall
The quintessential seaside sweet treat - Brighton rock. IMAGE CREDIT: Amanda Raw
 The quintessential seaside sweet treat  - Brighton rock. IMAGE CREDIT: Amanda Raw
Brighton is home to one of Britain’s most famous seaside attractions –the Grade-II listed landmark of Brighton Pier. IMAGE CREDIT: Andrew Marshall
 Brighton is home to one of Britain’s most famous seaside attractions –the Grade-II listed landmark of Brighton Pier. IMAGE CREDIT: Andrew Marshall
Cornwall's famous pasties. IMAGE CREDIT: Andrew Marshall
Cornwall
St Ives harbour. IMAGE CREDIT: Ian Wool/ 123RF Stock Photos
St Ives harbour. IMAGE CREDIT: Ian Wool/ 123RF Stock Photos